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February 02, 2013, at 07:26 AM by 101.173.127.248 -
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*[[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Bibliography.html|Bibliography]]. This is a list of some of the key sources, primarily where they appear in book form. More detailed references can be found in the notes associated with the entries in the Family Tree.
to:
*[[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Bibliography.html|Bibliography]]. This is a list of some of the key sources, primarily where they appear in book form. More detailed references can be found in the notes associated with the entries in the [[Main.FamilyTree|Family Tree]].
February 02, 2013, at 07:25 AM by 101.173.127.248 -
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->By 2013 it was obvious the material in the site was getting too complex for a simple website.  Most things linked to many  other things so how could one organise it?  It was all rather daunting because whatever I did looked likely to take a lot of time, just to move from the old to the new. After thinking about this a bit I decided to use a rather novel approach - to utilise the power of a Wiki.  Now, Wiki's were designed really for "crowd writing", but what I wanted was a side-product of that - namely that in order to allow multiple authorship and corrections possible a Wiki uses a very simple formatting and editing system (which can be used from any browser). It makes linking pages terribly easy, automatically links "Wiki Words" which I decided to use for names, and then has many powerful programs which can be added in to do things like footnoting, indexing, publishing, and much more.  The advantages of this were that these powerful features could be utilised and it is perfectly suited to being constantly updated and amended. The disadvantage was that some of the old web content still needed to  be included, at least for the time being, but the Wiki search engine cannot search those bits. So there are two search systems, as well as the indexes.  Actually I have never seen a Wiki used for this purpose, so any comments or advice will be very much welcomed, by me, the site editor.
to:
->By 2013 it was obvious the material in the site was getting too complex for a simple website.  Most things linked to many  other things so how should one organise it?  It was all rather daunting because whatever I did looked likely to take a lot of time, just to move from the old to the new. After thinking about this a bit I decided to use a rather novel approach - to utilise the power of a Wiki.  Now, Wiki's were designed really for "crowd writing", but what I wanted was a side-product of that - namely that in order to allow multiple authorship and corrections possible a Wiki uses a very simple formatting and editing system (which can be used from any browser). It makes linking pages terribly easy, automatically links "Wiki Words" which I decided to use for names, and then has many powerful programs which can be added in to do things like footnoting, indexing, publishing, and much more.  The advantages of this were that these powerful features could be utilised and it is perfectly suited to being constantly updated and amended. The disadvantage was that some of the old web content still needed to  be included, at least for the time being, but the Wiki search engine cannot search those bits. So there are two search systems, as well as the indexes.  Actually I have never seen a Wiki used for this purpose, so any comments or advice will be very much welcomed, by me, the site editor.
February 02, 2013, at 07:24 AM by 101.173.127.248 -
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->By 2013 it was obvious the material in the site was getting too complex for a simple website.  Most things linked to many  other things so how could one organise it?  It was all rather daunting because whatever I did looked likely to take a lot of time, just to move from the old to the new. After thinking about this a bit I decided to use a rather novel approach - to utilise the power of a Wiki.  Now, Wiki's were designed really for "crowd writing", but what I wanted was a side-product of that - namely that in order to allow multiple authorship and corrections possible a Wiki uses a very simple formatting and editing system (which can be used from any browser). It makes linking pages terribly easy, automatically links "WikiWords" which I decided to use for names, and then has many powerful programs which can be added in to do things like footnoting, indexing, publishing, and much more.  The advantages of this were that these powerful features could be utilised and it is perfectly suited to being constantly updated and amended. The disadvantage was that some of the old web content still needed to  be included, at least for the time being, but the Wiki search engine cannot search those bits. So there are two search systems, as well as the indexes.  Actually I have never seen a Wiki used for this purpose, so any comments or advice will be very much welcomed, by me, the site editor.
to:
->By 2013 it was obvious the material in the site was getting too complex for a simple website.  Most things linked to many  other things so how could one organise it?  It was all rather daunting because whatever I did looked likely to take a lot of time, just to move from the old to the new. After thinking about this a bit I decided to use a rather novel approach - to utilise the power of a Wiki.  Now, Wiki's were designed really for "crowd writing", but what I wanted was a side-product of that - namely that in order to allow multiple authorship and corrections possible a Wiki uses a very simple formatting and editing system (which can be used from any browser). It makes linking pages terribly easy, automatically links "Wiki Words" which I decided to use for names, and then has many powerful programs which can be added in to do things like footnoting, indexing, publishing, and much more.  The advantages of this were that these powerful features could be utilised and it is perfectly suited to being constantly updated and amended. The disadvantage was that some of the old web content still needed to  be included, at least for the time being, but the Wiki search engine cannot search those bits. So there are two search systems, as well as the indexes.  Actually I have never seen a Wiki used for this purpose, so any comments or advice will be very much welcomed, by me, the site editor.
February 02, 2013, at 07:24 AM by 101.173.127.248 -
Changed line 13 from:
->By 2013 it was obvious the material in the site was getting too complex for a simple website.  Most things linked to many  other things so how could one organise it?  It was all rather daunting because whatever I did looked likely to take a lot of time, just to move from the old to the new. After thinking about this a bit I decided to use a rather novel approach - to utilise the power of a Wiki.  Now, Wiki's were designed really for "crowd writing", but what I wanted was a side-product of that - namely that in order to make it possible a Wiki uses a very simple formatting and editing system (which can be done from any browser), makes linking pages terribly easy, and then has many powerful programs which can be added in to do things like footnoting, indexing, publishing, and much more.  The advantages of this were that these powerful features could be utilised and it is perfectly suited to being constantly updated and amended. The disadvantage was that some of the old web content still needed to  be included, at least for the time being, but the Wiki search engine cannot search those bits. So there are two search systems, as well as the indexes.  Actually I have never seen a Wiki used for this purpose, so any comments or advice will be very much welcomed, by me, the site editor.
to:
->By 2013 it was obvious the material in the site was getting too complex for a simple website.  Most things linked to many  other things so how could one organise it?  It was all rather daunting because whatever I did looked likely to take a lot of time, just to move from the old to the new. After thinking about this a bit I decided to use a rather novel approach - to utilise the power of a Wiki.  Now, Wiki's were designed really for "crowd writing", but what I wanted was a side-product of that - namely that in order to allow multiple authorship and corrections possible a Wiki uses a very simple formatting and editing system (which can be used from any browser). It makes linking pages terribly easy, automatically links "WikiWords" which I decided to use for names, and then has many powerful programs which can be added in to do things like footnoting, indexing, publishing, and much more.  The advantages of this were that these powerful features could be utilised and it is perfectly suited to being constantly updated and amended. The disadvantage was that some of the old web content still needed to  be included, at least for the time being, but the Wiki search engine cannot search those bits. So there are two search systems, as well as the indexes.  Actually I have never seen a Wiki used for this purpose, so any comments or advice will be very much welcomed, by me, the site editor.
February 02, 2013, at 07:21 AM by 101.173.127.248 -
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*It is appropriate to say a few words about the new design of this site.  Unlike most genealogical websites, the emphasis is less here on the family tree than on the history.  When I first set this up in 2004 it was as a web site, because I could use some of the nice features of the web - notably hyperlinks. Of course a family tree was needed, and the beauty of a website was that you could link people referred to in the histories to that tree rather than always having to explain in words where they sit.  Then of course it also turned out to be a nice way of sharing what was being discovered, because a thing like this was going to evolve as I learned more. Better still, people wrote back to correct and add to the site.  By 2013 it was obvious the material in the site was getting too complex for a simple website.  Most things linked to many  other things so how could one organise it?  It was all rather daunting because whatever I did looked likely to take a lot of time, just to move from the old to the new. After thinking about this a bit I decided to use a rather novel approach - to utilise the power of a Wiki.  Now, Wiki's were designed really for "crowd writing", but what I wanted was a side-product of that - namely that in order to make it possible a Wiki uses a very simple formatting and editing system (which can be done from any browser), makes linking pages terribly easy, and then has many powerful programs which can be added in to do things like footnoting, indexing, publishing, and much more.  The advantages of this were that these powerful features could be utilised and it is perfectly suited to being constantly updated and amended. The disadvantage was that some of the old web content still needed to  be included, at least for the time being, but the Wiki search engine cannot search those bits. So there are two search systems, as well as the indexes.  Actually I have never seen a Wiki used for this purpose, so any comments or advice will be very much welcomed, by me, the site editor.
to:
*It is appropriate to say a few words about the new design of this site.  Unlike most genealogical websites, the emphasis is less here on the family tree than on the history.  When I first set this up in 2004 it was as a web site, because I could use some of the nice features of the web - notably hyperlinks. Of course a family tree was needed, and the beauty of a website was that you could link people referred to in the histories to that tree rather than always having to explain in words where they sit.  Then of course it also turned out to be a nice way of sharing what was being discovered, because a thing like this was going to evolve as I learned more. Better still, people wrote back to correct and add to the site. 


->
By 2013 it was obvious the material in the site was getting too complex for a simple website.  Most things linked to many  other things so how could one organise it?  It was all rather daunting because whatever I did looked likely to take a lot of time, just to move from the old to the new. After thinking about this a bit I decided to use a rather novel approach - to utilise the power of a Wiki.  Now, Wiki's were designed really for "crowd writing", but what I wanted was a side-product of that - namely that in order to make it possible a Wiki uses a very simple formatting and editing system (which can be done from any browser), makes linking pages terribly easy, and then has many powerful programs which can be added in to do things like footnoting, indexing, publishing, and much more.  The advantages of this were that these powerful features could be utilised and it is perfectly suited to being constantly updated and amended. The disadvantage was that some of the old web content still needed to  be included, at least for the time being, but the Wiki search engine cannot search those bits. So there are two search systems, as well as the indexes.  Actually I have never seen a Wiki used for this purpose, so any comments or advice will be very much welcomed, by me, the site editor.
February 02, 2013, at 07:20 AM by 101.173.127.248 -
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*It is appropriate to say a few words about the new design of this site.  Unlike most genealogical websites, the emphasis is less here on the family tree than on the history.  When I first set this up in 2004 it was as a web site, because I could use some of the nice features of the web - notably hyperlinks. Then of course also it was a way of sharing what was discovered. Better still, people wrote back to correct and add to the site.  Of course a family tree was needed, and the beauty of a website was that you can link people referred to in the histories to that tree rather than always having to explain in words where they sit.  By 2013 it was obvious the material in the site was getting too complex for a simple websiteMost things linked to many  other things so how could one organise it?  After thinking about this a bit I decided to use a different approach - to utilise the power of a Wiki.  Now, Wiki's were designed really for "crowd writing", but what I wanted was a side-product of that - namely that in order to make it possible a Wiki uses a very simple formatting and editing system (which can be done from any browser), makes linking pages terribly easy, and then has many powerful programs which can be added in to do things like footnoting, indexing, publishing, and much more.  The advantages of this were that these powerful features could be utilised. The disadvantage was that some of the old web content still needed to  be included, but the Wiki search engine cannot search those bits. So there are two search systems, as well as the indexes.  Actually I have never seen a Wiki used for this purpose, so any comments or advice will be very much welcomed, by me, the site editor.
to:
*It is appropriate to say a few words about the new design of this site.  Unlike most genealogical websites, the emphasis is less here on the family tree than on the history.  When I first set this up in 2004 it was as a web site, because I could use some of the nice features of the web - notably hyperlinks. Of course a family tree was needed, and the beauty of a website was that you could link people referred to in the histories to that tree rather than always having to explain in words where they sit.  Then of course it also turned out to be a nice way of sharing what was being discovered, because a thing like this was going to evolve as I learned more. Better still, people wrote back to correct and add to the siteBy 2013 it was obvious the material in the site was getting too complex for a simple website.  Most things linked to many  other things so how could one organise it?  It was all rather daunting because whatever I did looked likely to take a lot of time, just to move from the old to the new. After thinking about this a bit I decided to use a rather novel approach - to utilise the power of a Wiki.  Now, Wiki's were designed really for "crowd writing", but what I wanted was a side-product of that - namely that in order to make it possible a Wiki uses a very simple formatting and editing system (which can be done from any browser), makes linking pages terribly easy, and then has many powerful programs which can be added in to do things like footnoting, indexing, publishing, and much more.  The advantages of this were that these powerful features could be utilised and it is perfectly suited to being constantly updated and amended. The disadvantage was that some of the old web content still needed to  be included, at least for the time being, but the Wiki search engine cannot search those bits. So there are two search systems, as well as the indexes.  Actually I have never seen a Wiki used for this purpose, so any comments or advice will be very much welcomed, by me, the site editor.
February 02, 2013, at 07:15 AM by 101.173.127.248 -
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*Following that are historical overviews of [[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/stories01.html|A tale of two men - Cassirer and Cohen 1530-1800]], the [[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/stories02.html|Cassirer ]] family and the holocaust, the [[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/stories03_1.html|Cohen]] family from convict to knighthood, general and cabinet minister, and the [[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/Falk01.html|Falk]] family.
to:
*Following that are historical overviews of [[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/stories01.html|A tale of two men - Cassirer and Cohen 1530-1800]], the [[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/stories02.html|Cassirer ]] family and the holocaust, the [[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/stories03_1.html|Cohen]] family from convict to knighthood, general and cabinet minister, and the [[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/Falk01.html|Falk]] family which bridges the other two.
February 02, 2013, at 07:14 AM by 101.173.127.248 -
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*[[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/acknowledgements.html|Acknowledgements]]. Work on this site is an ever-more collaborative process. I list here the contributions of those who have helped. If I have forgotten someone, I apologise.
to:
*[[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/acknowledgements.html|Acknowledgements]]. Work on this site is an ever-more collaborative process. Early on I listed here the contributions of those who had helped. But now so many have that most are acknowledged by footnotes.  My apologies if any contributors feel that more would be appropriate.
February 02, 2013, at 07:12 AM by 101.173.127.248 -
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*It is appropriate to say a few words about the new design of this site.  Unlike most genealogical websites, the emphasis is less here on the family tree than on the history.  When I first set this up in 2004 it was as a web site, because I could use some of the nice features of the web - notably hyperlinks. Then of course also it was a way of sharing what was discovered. Better still, people wrote back to correct and add to the site.  Of course a family tree was needed, and the beauty of a website was that you can link people referred to in the histories to that tree rather than always having to explain in words where they sit.  By 2013 it was obvious the material in the site was getting too complex for a simple website.  Most things linked to many  other things so how could one organise it?  After thinking about this a bit I decided to use a different approach - to utilise the power of a Wiki.  Now, Wiki's were designed really for "crowd writing", but what I wanted was a side-product of that - namely that in order to make it possible a Wiki uses a very simple formatting and editing system (which can be done from any browser), makes linking pages terribly easy, and then has many powerful programs which can be added in to do things like footnoting, indexing, publishing, and much more.  The advantage of this were that these powerful features became available. The disadvantage was that some of the old web content still needed to  be included, but the Wiki search engine cannot search those bits. So there are two search systems, as well as the indexes.  Actually I have never seen a Wiki used for this purpose, so any comments or advice will be very much welcomed, by me, the site editor.
to:
*It is appropriate to say a few words about the new design of this site.  Unlike most genealogical websites, the emphasis is less here on the family tree than on the history.  When I first set this up in 2004 it was as a web site, because I could use some of the nice features of the web - notably hyperlinks. Then of course also it was a way of sharing what was discovered. Better still, people wrote back to correct and add to the site.  Of course a family tree was needed, and the beauty of a website was that you can link people referred to in the histories to that tree rather than always having to explain in words where they sit.  By 2013 it was obvious the material in the site was getting too complex for a simple website.  Most things linked to many  other things so how could one organise it?  After thinking about this a bit I decided to use a different approach - to utilise the power of a Wiki.  Now, Wiki's were designed really for "crowd writing", but what I wanted was a side-product of that - namely that in order to make it possible a Wiki uses a very simple formatting and editing system (which can be done from any browser), makes linking pages terribly easy, and then has many powerful programs which can be added in to do things like footnoting, indexing, publishing, and much more.  The advantages of this were that these powerful features could be utilised. The disadvantage was that some of the old web content still needed to  be included, but the Wiki search engine cannot search those bits. So there are two search systems, as well as the indexes.  Actually I have never seen a Wiki used for this purpose, so any comments or advice will be very much welcomed, by me, the site editor.
February 02, 2013, at 07:11 AM by 101.173.127.248 -
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*It is appropriate to say a few words about the new design of this site.  Unlike most genealogical websites, the emphasis is less here on the family tree than on the history.  When I first set this up it was as a web site, because I could use some of the nice features of the web - notably hyperlinks. Then of course also it was a way of sharing what was discovered. Better still, people wrote back to correct and add to the site.  Of course a family tree was needed, and the beauty of a website was that you can link people referred to in the histories to that tree rather than always having to explain in words where they sit.  By 2013 it was obvious the material in the site was getting to complex for a simple website.  Most things linked to many  other things so how could one organise it?  After thinking about this a bit I decided to use a different approach - to utilise the power of a Wiki.  Now, Wiki's were designed really for "crowd writing", but what I wanted was a side-product of that - namely that in order to make it possible a Wiki uses a very simple formatting and editing system (which can be done from any browser), makes linking pages terribly easy, and then has many powerful programs which can be added in to do things like footnoting, indexing, publishing, and much more.  The advantage of this were that these powerful features became available. The disadvantage was that some of the old web content still needed to  be included, but the Wiki search engine cannot search those bits. So there are two search systems, as well as the indexes.  Actually I have never seen a Wiki used for this purpose, so any comments or advice will be very much welcomed, by me, the site editor.
to:
*It is appropriate to say a few words about the new design of this site.  Unlike most genealogical websites, the emphasis is less here on the family tree than on the history.  When I first set this up in 2004 it was as a web site, because I could use some of the nice features of the web - notably hyperlinks. Then of course also it was a way of sharing what was discovered. Better still, people wrote back to correct and add to the site.  Of course a family tree was needed, and the beauty of a website was that you can link people referred to in the histories to that tree rather than always having to explain in words where they sit.  By 2013 it was obvious the material in the site was getting too complex for a simple website.  Most things linked to many  other things so how could one organise it?  After thinking about this a bit I decided to use a different approach - to utilise the power of a Wiki.  Now, Wiki's were designed really for "crowd writing", but what I wanted was a side-product of that - namely that in order to make it possible a Wiki uses a very simple formatting and editing system (which can be done from any browser), makes linking pages terribly easy, and then has many powerful programs which can be added in to do things like footnoting, indexing, publishing, and much more.  The advantage of this were that these powerful features became available. The disadvantage was that some of the old web content still needed to  be included, but the Wiki search engine cannot search those bits. So there are two search systems, as well as the indexes.  Actually I have never seen a Wiki used for this purpose, so any comments or advice will be very much welcomed, by me, the site editor.
February 02, 2013, at 07:10 AM by 101.173.127.248 -
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!!!A note about the site
*It is appropriate to say a few words about the new design of this site.  Unlike most genealogical websites, the emphasis is less here on the family tree than on the history.  When I first set this up it was as a web site, because I could use some of the nice features of the web - notably hyperlinks. Then of course also it was a way of sharing what was discovered. Better still, people wrote back to correct and add to the site.  Of course a family tree was needed, and the beauty of a website was that you can link people referred to in the histories to that tree rather than always having to explain in words where they sit.  By 2013 it was obvious the material in the site was getting to complex for a simple website.  Most things linked to many  other things so how could one organise it?  After thinking about this a bit I decided to use a different approach - to utilise the power of a Wiki.  Now, Wiki's were designed really for "crowd writing", but what I wanted was a side-product of that - namely that in order to make it possible a Wiki uses a very simple formatting and editing system (which can be done from any browser), makes linking pages terribly easy, and then has many powerful programs which can be added in to do things like footnoting, indexing, publishing, and much more.  The advantage of this were that these powerful features became available. The disadvantage was that some of the old web content still needed to  be included, but the Wiki search engine cannot search those bits. So there are two search systems, as well as the indexes.  Actually I have never seen a Wiki used for this purpose, so any comments or advice will be very much welcomed, by me, the site editor.
Changed line 13 from:
*http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Bibliography.html|Bibliography]]. This is a list of some of the key sources, primarily where they appear in book form. More detailed references can be found in the notes associated with the entries in the Family Tree.
to:
*[[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Bibliography.html|Bibliography]]. This is a list of some of the key sources, primarily where they appear in book form. More detailed references can be found in the notes associated with the entries in the Family Tree.
December 23, 2012, at 11:08 AM by 58.178.148.143 -
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*[[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/stories.html|**Overview of the Cohen - Cassirer history**]] ** is the first place to look to understand the big picture**. It provides and overview of themes and histories in the site.
to:
*[[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/stories.html|**Overview of the Cohen - Cassirer history**]] is the first place to look to understand the big picture.
December 23, 2012, at 11:08 AM by 58.178.148.143 -
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If you have not read the histories, then before the documents you would be wise to at least skim
*[[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/stories.html|**Overview of the Cohen - Cassirer history**]] **which
is the first place to look to understand the big picture**. It provides and overview of themes and histories in the site.
to:
*[[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/stories.html|**Overview of the Cohen - Cassirer history**]] ** is the first place to look to understand the big picture**. It provides and overview of themes and histories in the site.
December 23, 2012, at 11:07 AM by 58.178.148.143 -
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(:title Overview :)
This section covers those documents which cannot be categorised under the three families.

December 23, 2012, at 11:05 AM by 58.178.148.143 -
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!!!Acknowledgements and References
to:
!!!Overview Documents
December 23, 2012, at 11:05 AM by 58.178.148.143 -
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!!!Overviews
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!!!Historical Overviews
December 23, 2012, at 08:30 AM by 58.178.148.143 -
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Overviews
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!!!Overviews
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[[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/acknowledgements.html|Acknowledgements]]. Work on this site is an ever-more collaborative process. I list here the contributions of those who have helped. If I have forgotten someone, I apologise.

http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Bibliography.html|Bibliography]]. This is a list of some of the key sources, primarily where they appear in book form. More detailed references can be found in the notes associated with the entries in the Family Tree.
to:
!!!Acknowledgements and References

*
[[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/acknowledgements.html|Acknowledgements]]. Work on this site is an ever-more collaborative process. I list here the contributions of those who have helped. If I have forgotten someone, I apologise.

*http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Bibliography.html|Bibliography]]. This is a list of some of the key sources, primarily where they appear in book form. More detailed references can be found in the notes associated with the entries in the Family Tree.
December 23, 2012, at 08:29 AM by 58.178.148.143 -
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[[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/acknowledgements.html|Acknowledgements]]. Work on this site is an ever-more collaborative process. I list here the contributions of those who have helped. If I have forgotten someone, I apologise.

http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Bibliography.html|Bibliography]]. This is a list of some of the key sources, primarily where they appear in book form. More detailed references can be found in the notes associated with the entries in the Family Tree.
December 22, 2012, at 11:49 AM by 58.178.148.143 -
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Overviews
to:
Overviews

If you have not read the histories, then before the documents you would be wise to at least skim
*[[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/stories.html|**Overview of the Cohen - Cassirer history**]] **which is the first place to look to understand the big picture**. It provides and overview of themes and histories in the site.
*Following that are historical overviews of [[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/stories01.html|A tale of two men - Cassirer and Cohen 1530-1800]], the [[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/stories02.html|Cassirer ]] family and the holocaust, the [[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/stories03_1.html|Cohen]] family from convict to knighthood, general and cabinet minister, and the [[http://metastudies.net/genealogy/ZDocs/Stories/Falk01.html|Falk]] family.
December 18, 2012, at 07:47 AM by 203.184.43.179 -
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Overviews


Page last modified on February 02, 2013, at 07:26 AM